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Mike kindly pointed out in the emails I forgot to mention that in Genesis 17, God himself tells Abraham he will become the father of a multitude of nations.

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Jul 24, 2023Liked by Fr Calvin Robinson

I (like) that you removed Fr from Twitter. I see it as something similar to abstaining from a glass of wine in public for the sake of those with (weaker faith). I love your explanation of and use of, the term Father in Christianity. I am an Evangelical Christian. I may not fully embrace all of Anglo-Catholic traditions, but I am not willing to reject you, Fr Calvin Robinson. I consider you a good shepherd and a brother in Christ. I want more people to hear what you have to say, because I believe we need people like you in our world. If removing Father from Twitter accomplishes this, I'm all for it. I don't see it as compromising.

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I grew up Pentecostal (Assemblies of God, non-liturgical), so of course, we never used the title Father, but this has never been a hang up for me. I've been very interested in studying and teaching others about more traditional/liturgical Christianity, and I'll keep this in my back pocket, in case the objection is raised. Thanks, Father Calvin!

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Jul 21, 2023Liked by Fr Calvin Robinson

Thank you for beautifully, succinctly and non-judgmentally clarifying this issue. It makes the matter clear. It is surprising that you removed the Father from your Twitter. You seem to back down for no one. I am thankful you are seeking to find the beauty of commonality rather than seeking for ways to find division among the flock. I am praying for you as you are on the front lines in the fight for the faith. Praying for your stamina as well as rest.

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Jul 24, 2023Liked by Fr Calvin Robinson

I just wish to comment in general that I have become a Calvin Robinson junkie.

Our family left the American Episcopal Church in 1977 to the Anglican Catholic Church here in America.

Forty years in the desert, but now we see a new generation of true Anglicans taking up the faith. So happy for this! Our third son is an Anglican priest with a large family and a faithful church in Denver, Colorado.

God bless you Father Robinson. We will pray for you! Thank you for your faith and courage!

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All quite true, and further to the above, it has Apostolic precedent: St Paul describes himself as "father" to the Corinthian church (1 Cor 4:15). Hence it makes sense that from the earliest days of the church, clergy were addressed as "Father." Once again, the attackers of tradition seem to think that they know what Our Lord did and did not teach better than the first two or three generations of his followers, on the basis of the texts available to them almost two millennia later - even though St John explicitly ends his Gospel with the warning that it would be impossible to write down everything that Our Lord said and taught (Jn 21:25).

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Jul 21, 2023Liked by Fr Calvin Robinson

Some people do not understand tradition.

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Jul 21, 2023Liked by Fr Calvin Robinson

Great article Father! You'd make a great Catholic! Many who want to take Jesus literally in this Matthew 23 verse seem to be much less willing to do so when it comes to verses like John Chapter 6 ("my flesh is true food..."). Perhaps we need an Authoritative Institution inspired by the Holy Spirit to interpret scripture?....

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Jul 21, 2023Liked by Fr Calvin Robinson

i have seen people argue that pope is illegitimate because the word "pope" derives from "father" and Matthew 23 says call no man father

true story

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Jul 21, 2023Liked by Fr Calvin Robinson

Thank you, Father.

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Jul 21, 2023Liked by Fr Calvin Robinson

Interesting thoughts Calvin. I never set out to be called father and I did not come from that tradition but found in ministry it was a term that was just used by many for me in various places so it stuck, I became Father Tim. I never really minded as so many people used it but generally I would always say just call me Tim. I suppose as with any labels the Gospel I felt just remained the same whatever I was called.

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Jul 22, 2023Liked by Fr Calvin Robinson

Logical, clear explanation. Having been brought up Catholic I call all priests ‘Father’ including vicars...🤷🏽‍♂️

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Jul 22, 2023Liked by Fr Calvin Robinson

An excellent piece, Fr Calvin. As a mark of respect for the person and the office, I invariably call priests, ministers / pastors and religious ' Fr, Pastor, Revd, Br or Sr.'

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I guess I am a little puritanical to be fair but I just prefer to use peoples names and not titles. Each to their own. I respect your view point though. I have found many “reverends” are anything but people to be revered and one earthly father is all I need. Thank you for your steadfastness in holding to scripture in the face of so much opposition. I pray our Lord continues to use you and bless others through your faithfulness to Him.

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Jul 22, 2023·edited Jul 22, 2023

In my own Anglo-Catholic tradition, only ordained priests are addressed by the title "Father", & ordained deacons are addressed as "Reverend" - but of course, I do understand that traditions pertaining to those titles may vary in different regions & countries, so it's not something I would consider contentious if a deacon in some areas is addressed as "Father".

However, I do believe it's natural to want to address such people using an appropriate title, simply as a mark of respect for their role & their qualifications. In order to become an ordained deacon or priest these days, there's usually a requirement to have at least the equivalent of a university Bachelor's degree in Theology/Divinity or similarly titled qualification, so that they are able to lead & teach a church congregation. The period of time spent as a deacon/curate in a parish church (usually around 12 months or so) helps to provide practical experience & training in doing that, prior to ordination to the priesthood, if that is the ultimate intention.

My own parish church has helped to provide that practical experience to several deacons, over a number of years, all of whom have eventually been ordained into the priesthood & are now either serving as priests in other parish churches or as military chaplains in the armed forces. Those serving as parish priests do usually get addressed as "Father", while those serving as military chaplains are usually addressed as "Padre" - which is both the Spanish & Italian word for "father" in any case.

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I am offended by the pope being blasphemously called 'holy father', an ascription derived from John 17:11! It must be rejected in toto.

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